Ireland

Study in Ireland

Softamo Education Group

About Ireland

Ireland was inhabited as early as 8,000 BC. Its early Brehon Law system was highly sophisticated, and when Europe entered the Dark Ages, Ireland's monasteries remained a beacon of culture and learning throughout the continent. However, Ireland was to face its own dark times, first with the Viking and then the Anglo-Norman invasions. Ireland's darkest era, the Great Famine of 1845-49, saw over a million die and another million emigrate, sowing the first seeds of the Irish Diaspora.

The early 1900s saw a doomed uprising in 1916; a war of independence and the signing of the Anglo-Irish treaty. This treaty ended British rule in 26 of the 32 counties and established an Irish Free State. In 1937, a new constitution re-established the Irish Free State as Ireland, and in 1949, Ireland was declared a Republic.

In Northern Ireland, the initially peaceful civil rights marches of the 1960s were followed by several decades of violence. However, in 1998, a peace-plan was agreed by all parties; organisations on all sides lay down their arms, and Northern Ireland is now at peace. In 2013, the Global Peace Index ranked the Republic of Ireland the 12th most peaceful nation on earth.

Punching well above its weight on the international stage, Ireland's distinctive historical circumstances combine with its unique position as a European post-colonial state, its neutrality and its trusted partner status in so many conflict zones to ensure a sustained and valuable impact. Today Ireland is recognised as a global leader (both academically and in practice) in the fields of international relations & law, peace and conflict studies, human rights and development.

The Republic of Ireland is also one of the most globalised economies in the world, according to a 2013 index produced by Ernst and Young in collaboration with the Economist Intelligence Unit. Since the 1970s, Ireland has evolved from a largely agrarian society to become a major player in the international software, food, pharmaceutical and medical technology industries.

In the wake of a major financial contraction over the period of 2008-10, the Irish government has implemented a series of tough reforms. Having shaken off the excesses of the 'Celtic Tiger' boom-years, the economy returned to growth in 2011, and all indicators are for steady, if modest, growth for the years to come.

Study in Ireland
As far back as 500 AD, Ireland, and its monks and monasteries, were at the centre of learning in Europe, earning Ireland the title Land of Saints and Scholars. In 1592, Trinity College Dublin received its charter and university status. National University of Ireland Maynooth dates back to 1795, and the universities in Galway and Cork were both founded in 1845.

Ireland's history has engendered a deep appreciation and respect for learning, and, today, educational attainment rates are among the highest in the world. Over 85 per cent of young people complete secondary level education, and over two-thirds of those go on to higher level education. Ireland is ranked first in Europe in terms of graduates per 1,000 inhabitants.

Government investment in world class facilities build on a lengthy tradition of academic excellence. Today, there are seven universities, 14 Institutes of Technology and many other world-leading education and research centres, housed in state-of-the-art facilities on beautiful campuses.

Irish research ranks within the top one per cent globally in 18 research fields, and all of the country's universities are in the top 3 per cent worldwide. Students from 160 countries study in Ireland and make up 12 per cent of the student population.
WHY IRELAND
The Irish Government invests over 782 million annually in research in Ireland's higher education institutions. The impact of this funding is that Ireland's higher education institutions now lead the world in an increasing number of fields.

Irish universities are in the top 1% of research institutions in the world in terms of research impact in 19 fields, spanning natural sciences, social sciences and the humanities. This creates a unique opportunity for you at undergraduate and postgraduate level to join research programmes that are driving innovation and changing lives worldwide.

Ireland is also where some of the world’s biggest and best companies have located key strategic research facilities. And in Ireland, you’ll find a unique ecosystem that sees academic researchers working hand-in-hand with small home-grown and start-up companies in partnership with some of the most powerful multinationals on the planet through a programme for shared research projects developed by Enterprise Ireland and IDA Ireland.
Living Costs
Average living costs may differ somewhat depending on if you choose to study in Northern Ireland or in the Republic as different rules and fees apply.

For study at public institution in the Republic of Ireland, you can use the following guideline costs. These may however vary depending on institution and where you live (city or outside, university or private housing).

• Average living costs: 7480 (Euro)
• Home students tuition fees (this often includes EU and EEA citizens): Minimum: 0 (Euro)
• Foreign students tuition fees: Minimum: 7600 (Euro)
• Maximum: 17900 (Euro)


FAQs

  • Do Irish institutions accept 10+2+3 education system of India?

    Yes, 10+2+3 system is accepted by Irish universities for masters programs.

  • What and where to study in Ireland after 12th?

    Choosing a program and an institution solely depends on your interests, academic background, and budget. To decide where to study and what to pursue, you can start by creating a list of your interests and skills and spend some time reflecting upon it. Do your research to understand which skillset or interest has a good scope professionally. Narrow down your choices accordingly and search for relevant courses and institutions. You’ll also have to take intakes of your preferred courses into consideration, because not all universities or colleges offer programs in all three intakes.

    Our handy guide can help you choose a course that suits your profile and needs the best. You can book a free counselling session with our experienced counsellors who can advise you on course selection, application submission, and visa procedure.

  • What and where to study in Ireland after graduation?

    Pursuing masters in Ireland can be one of the best decisions of your life since it’ll not only enhance your technical skills but also give your CV an edge over others. As an Indian student with an undergrad degree, you should be ideally looking for an institution that emphasises on practical knowledge, hands-on experience and getting you job-ready. Universities and colleges in Ireland provide an interactive learning approach wherein you’ll be engaging with your classmates and your instructor alike while understanding the topic/concept of discussion.

    Begin by taking a look at the subjects you learnt in your undergrad program, list down the ones that interest you. Narrow down to your preferred niche and search for possible programs and universities. Ireland is one of the few countries that provide masters in several niche courses gaining a lot of popularity in the current market. For instance, you can get a master’s degree course in subjects like digital marketing, analytics and strategic management which are otherwise not easily available in India. Applying to Irish universities and colleges would also require you to take language and/or aptitude tests. So, do consider your academic scores while deciding what and where to study. Look for the intake offered for your preferred courses and prepare accordingly.

    Our experienced counsellors can help you identify and secure the university or college where you can thrive. Visit your nearest IDP office for free advice on how to further your post-graduate career in Ireland.

  • Which English language tests are accepted by Irish institutions?

    The International English Language Testing System (IELTS) is the most preferred English language proficiency test accepted by almost all institutions in Ireland. However, globally, Irish institutions are open to accepting other proficiency tests as well (do check the official website of your preferred institution for the same).

  • Can students work during studies in Ireland?

    All Indian students are allowed to work for 20 hours per week during the academic session and 40-hours per week during the months of May, June, July, August and from December 15th to January 15th.

  • Are qualifications from Ireland recognised worldwide?

    Yes, degrees from Ireland institutions are accepted worldwide and known for their quality of education.

  • What are the accommodation options available in Ireland?

    As an Indian student, you can opt for on-campus residence facility or look for an off-campus accommodation. Most universities in Ireland offer Halls of residence (self-catered or full-board) for students from other countries. Living as a resident on-campus is a very affordable option, however you need to apply for it separately, and well ahead in time to secure a slot for yourself.

    If you are unable to find such accommodation or wish to stay alone, you can get a space for yourself on rent in shared apartments or stay with a local Irish family. Remember, the rentals will vary from city to city. Your IDP counsellor will also help you find an accommodation that works out the best for you.

  • Are there any special requirements for under -18 students to study in Ireland?

    If you’re 16 or 17 years old, you must have written consent from your parents/guardians that you can live and travel independently along with the details of your guardian in Ireland. Your IDP counsellor will help you with the same when you apply for your visa.

  • What is the cost of living?

    Living expenses will differ depending upon the location of the institution, the type of accommodation preferred and on the personal expenditure of the student. On average, we estimate that a student will spend between €6,000 and €11,000 per year depending on location and lifestyle.

  • Do I need to register with the police?

    All non-Irish nationals, who are not citizens of the EU/EEA or Switzerland, must register in person with the Garda National Immigration Bureau (GNIB) after arrival and after completion of registration at your third level institution. The GNIB will issue you with a residence permit/GNIB card.

  • How do I get a visa?

    If you are an EU citizen, there are no visa requirements when entering Ireland. If you are not an EU citizen, please contact your nearest Irish Embassy or Consulate to find out whether or not you require an entry visa or you may enquire from the Department of Foreign Affairs. Those who do not have an Irish diplomatic mission in their home country should download a visa application form well in advance of their departure. Please note that it is possible for international students who require a visa and are residing in certain countries to apply directly to the Department of Foreign Affairs online. Click here for a full list of these countries and the link to the online application form.

    Note: You will be required to have accepted an offer of a recognised programme of study in Ireland and to have a receipt of payment letter from a college in Ireland before you can begin the process of applying for your visa overseas to study in Ireland.

  • Do I have to pay for medical insurance?

    Students from EU member states who are in possession of the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) are entitled to public health services in Ireland. This card is available from health authorities in your home country. Further information to your rights on healthcare while here can be obtained on the European Health Insurance Card website.

    For students from non-EU countries, you will be required to have medical insurance in place in order to be granted a visa.

  • Can I study part time?

    If you are from a non-EU country, you must complete a minimum of 15 hours scheduled contact time per week in order to be eligible to be eligible for a visa to study in Ireland. Please see the following Department of Justice web site for more information. If you are an English language study wishing to study for less than 90 days in Ireland and combine learning with other tourist pursuits, you will be classed as an educational tourist and subject to visit/holiday visa rules.

  • What will the weather be like?

    Ireland's climate can be summed up as being mild, moist and changeable with abundant rainfall and a lack of temperature extremes. Because the island is hugged all year round by the warm influence of the Gulf Stream, Ireland is much warmer than other countries that share its latitude. The Gulf Stream also ensures that the Irish coastline remains ice-free throughout winter. Extreme winters are rare but they do happen on the odd occasion when Ireland's temperatures plummet.

  • How do I open a bank account?

    In order to open a bank account, you will need two forms of identification. Irish banks are obliged to establish your identity and verify your address. You cannot use the same document as proof of both your identity and your address. These are minimum requirements and it is at the discretion of the bank to look for further information.

  • Can I work during or after my studies?

    Non-EU students who are approved to study in Ireland with higher education institutionslisted on the ILEP, can avail of casual work to help support themselves while in Ireland. Students are allowed to work part-time (up to 20 hours a week) or full-time (up to 40 hours a week) during holiday periods.

  • Are there scholarships?

    Yes. A small number of scholarships for overseas students are available from the universities and colleges. These are awarded solely at the discretion of the individual institutions who set down their own criteria for eligibility. Students are advised to contact the institution of their choice directly, to obtain information.

Softamo Education Group